As part of the build up to the big game on Saturday, we spent some time asking our Sporting Memories Group who attend Fir Park every Wednesday afternoon for their favourite memories from the past.

 

Willie Brunton, Peter Gonella and Alan Haddow reminisced about the famous win in 1952. They said “We all remember the 1952 Final. We played 10 games including 2 replays against Hearts in the semi final, and yet when we got to the final we beat Dundee quite comfortably 4-0 in front of 136,000 people at Hampden. We remember the team going round the town in an open top double decker bus showing off the Cup and then the team had a meal in the old Robs tea room after which the big windows were thrown up and the cup displayed for all to see.”

 

Former stadium announcer Alex Connacher looked back upon the famous day in May in 1991 with a fond memory. “The 1991 final was very memorable. I was the stadium announcer at Fir Park for a number of years and after the team returned to Motherwell the cup was being paraded around the town on an open top bus. The manager Tommy McClean, spotted my wife and I in the crowd cheering the teams victory. He then invited me and my wife to join the people on the bus. Unfortunately, my wife was too shy to do this. It would have been great however it was a memorable day nonetheless.”

 

Kenny MacGregor and former Well legend Billy Reid were also happy to share their memory from 91. “We remember the family final of 1991 so called because the Well were managed by Tommy McClean and Dundee Utd by Jim McClean and there being no involvement of the Old Firm. We remember that sadly, the McCleans father passed away in the week leading up to the game. Their brother Willie was also manager of Motherwell at one time. Their father would have been very proud to have seen both his sons lead the teams out.”

 

Richard Park and Jim Closs remembered both finals from 1952 and 1991 fondly, however they were keen to remark on an act of bravery as their favourite moment to remember.

“We remember both the 1952 and 1991 finals. Our abiding memories of the 1991 Cup Final were Ally Maxwell, the goalkeeper breaking his ribs following a ‘challenge’ by Uniteds’ John Clark. Despite being badly injured, Ally bravely insisted on playing on. There were no substitute goalkeepers in those days and Ally had to play for the remainder of the 90 minutes then 30 additional minutes of extra time. If he had had to come off, he would likely have been replaced by Stevie Kirk, who had previously had to go in goals when a goalkeeper had been injured against Hearts where he saved a penalty. In which case, Stevie wouldn’t have been the super sub to score the winning goal in the famous final.”

 

Hopefully this Saturday at Hampden will be an opportunity for a new generation to create everlasting memories with a new bunch of heroes to remember holding the famous trophy aloft!